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Book review: The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari: A Fable About Fulfilling Your Dreams and Reaching Your Destiny

by

Robin S. Sharma

This inspiring tale provides a step-by-step approach to living with greater courage, balance, abundance, and joy. A wonderfully crafted fable, The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari tells the extraordinary story of Julian Mantle, a lawyer forced to confront the spiritual crisis of his out-of-balance life. On a life-changing odyssey to an ancient culture, he discovers powerful, wise, and practical lessons that teach us to:

Develop Joyful Thoughts, Follow Our Life’s Mission and Calling, Cultivate Self-Discipline and Act Courageously, Value Time as Our Most Important Commodity, Nourish Our Relationships, and Live Fully, One Day at a Time.

This is one of the better books in the realm of personal development in close association with spirituality.

The story is of Julian Mantle, a hotshot lawyer who has everything that money can buy, who has his life turned around when he gets a heart attack in the midst of a courtroom. He then goes to the mysterious land of India to get away from the fast paced frenzy and to rediscover his soul and find his true purpose and meaning in life.

Here he is met with sages of sivana, the monks who live in the cold mountain regions, living a complete life in terms of mind, body and soul, being happy and living till the age of 100 and above. Julian learns a lot about how to live life in search of true meaning. He learns about the virtues that can enable him to be more full and happier.

The writing is straight forward, the progression of events very peaceful, and the journey described very thought provoking and at times enlightening.

Some books are meant to be tasted, some are meant to chewed, some digested. While there are some rare books that not only meant to be digested but also made to be a part of the body and mind. The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari is one such book.

The books moves at a good pace and the never becomes boring as peachy books tend to be. In fact, the way the teachings have been presented in a story format is the most important reason why this book has become so popular among the masses. It also lasts only 200-odd pages hence can easily be completed on a long train or road journey. It took me three days to complete the book as I had other things to do, but at my normal pace I could have easily competed it in 4-5 hours. However this is not a book which is meant to be read quickly and forgotten, and is best read slowly. It takes some time to understand some of the teachings, and requires inflection as to how they can be applied in our own life. The teachings are simple and some of them are well-known. But the presentation of the ideas is what sets this book apart from other books.

All of the teachings can be remembered by the simple story of the sumo wrestler told in the book.

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